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Few phenomena embody the notion of time like fashion. Rooted in the now, fashion creates its past through a process of rapid style change. It moves with speed and is always on the verge of becoming something else.  The current era, which we might call “industrial time, ” identifies the seasonal nature of fashion as an industry and shows its impact on workers, consumers, and the environment alike. Over time it has devised increasingly efficient responses to market demand, reducing the duration of the design, production, and distribution phases; in the mid-1980s, the development of the “quick response” approach enabled fashion to speed up distribution between manufacturers and stores, accelerating the flow of sales data from the latter, and contributing to the creation of the Fast Fashion phenomenon. In the face of this, however, came the so-called Slow Fashion. Such expression was born on the “slow food” model, launched by a group of Italian activists in the 1980s in opposition to the spread at that time of fast food chains, such as McDonald’s, to indicate a production system that respects workers’ rights and the environment. The development of this phenomenon, gained momentum as high fashion began to put into circulation the strategy based on “see now buy now,” thus consistently reducing the time between fashion shows and in-store availability of new collections. Consumers began to show increased sensitivity to fashion, directing their demand toward products in line with the seasonal fashions “imposed” on the catwalks and beginning to buy clothes more for their pleasure than for an actual need.    We at Zer0W will never tire of repeating: a business system having these characteristics only produces serious environmental and social effects; making clothes generally requires the use of a lot of water, chemicals, and the emission of significant amounts of greenhouse gases. Increasingly, situations of exploitation of garment factory workers emerge because they are underpaid and exposed to unsafe working conditions.    Fast fashion, therefore, may not be all that convenient for the environment and society. By compressing production cycles and making designs that are always up-to-date, fashion companies have enabled buyers not only to expand their closets but also to update them quickly. Heike Jenss, professor of fashion studies at Parsons School of Design in New York, argues that fashion can be seen as ” a material way of ‘making time,’ perhaps as an effort to make time and the present, materially graspable. To wear fashion is therefore to ‘wear time.'” Let us, therefore, dress it as long and as well as possible. Without waste.

Few phenomena embody the notion of time like fashion. Rooted in the now, fashion creates its past through a process of rapid style change. It moves with speed and is always on the verge of becoming something else.

The current era, which we might call “industrial time, ” identifies the seasonal nature of fashion as an industry and shows its impact on workers, consumers, and the environment alike. Over time it has devised increasingly efficient responses to market demand, reducing the duration of the design, production, and distribution phases; in the mid-1980s, the development of the “quick response” approach enabled fashion to speed up distribution between manufacturers and stores, accelerating the flow of sales data from the latter, and contributing to the creation of the Fast Fashion phenomenon. In the face of this, however, came the so-called Slow Fashion. Such expression was born on the “slow food” model, launched by a group of Italian activists in the 1980s in opposition to the spread at that time of fast food chains, such as McDonald’s, to indicate a production system that respects workers’ rights and the environment. The development of this phenomenon, gained momentum as high fashion began to put into circulation the strategy based on “see now buy now,” thus consistently reducing the time between fashion shows and in-store availability of new collections. Consumers began to show increased sensitivity to fashion, directing their demand toward products in line with the seasonal fashions “imposed” on the catwalks and beginning to buy clothes more for their pleasure than for an actual need.

 

We at Zer0W will never tire of repeating: a business system having these characteristics only produces serious environmental and social effects; making clothes generally requires the use of a lot of water, chemicals, and the emission of significant amounts of greenhouse gases. Increasingly, situations of exploitation of garment factory workers emerge because they are underpaid and exposed to unsafe working conditions.

Fast fashion, therefore, may not be all that convenient for the environment and society. By compressing production cycles and making designs that are always up-to-date, fashion companies have enabled buyers not only to expand their closets but also to update them quickly. Heike Jenss, professor of fashion studies at Parsons School of Design in New York, argues that fashion can be seen as ” a material way of ‘making time,’ perhaps as an effort to make time and the present, materially graspable. To wear fashion is therefore to ‘wear time.’”

Let us, therefore, dress it as long and as well as possible. Without waste.

 

Zerow stands for Zero Waste. We are a community of companies, artisans, designers and people who love sustainable products. We offer a marketplace where you can buy upcycled products and leftovers and a circular network made to connect companies and artisans for transforming waste into products.

Zerow allows you to sell leftover materials (or pre-production waste) such as textile, leather or other secondary raw materials. Also metal accessories, tools, boxes, machines and everything which can be used for production and sell purposes is welcome. Let’s upcycle it!

Possible refunds and exchanges will be processed within 14 working days upon the arrival into our warehouse.

ZEROW has verified the production chain of this product and registered the production details on the EOS public blockchain.

When you notarize a document with blockchain technology, it becomes permanent.
Blockchain technology guarantees the unchangeability of a document. You can discover when a document was notarized thanks to the hashcode

Shipping time and costs depending on the product you are going to purchase especially if it is a product that is made to order.

If you are an artisan or a brand committed to quality, tradition, craftsmanship, and circularity please visit contact us. If you are aligned to our philosophy you will be very welcome to join our marketplace and we will be happy to have you on our side in the fight against waste.

We honor return requests made within 14 days after receiving the original purchase.

Zerow accepts returns of unworn, unwashed, and undamaged items, with no signs of use, for refund. Please note that customized, personalized and exchanged products cannot be returned.

Returns must be packaged in the Zerow box, which must be securely sealed with adhesive tape. In case our box is no longer available, you may use another type of packaging suitable for the shipment of our items.

If the original order was below the 150€ threshold for free shipping the shipping fee will be excluded from the refund. If a partial return brings the total amount paid below 150€, the shipping amount will be deducted from the refund according to your local shipping rate.

It means that there is no stock for that particular product. It will be manufactured only once the order is placed. This helps the reduction of wasted materials and resources. You can find the ‘Crafting time’ in the description of the product.

Click here the link, and download it!

Offering aftercare, post-purchase services has always been a priority for Zerow, that’s why if some of the products you bought on our platform deteriorate or break, Zero’s team is ready to pick up, reset and send them back to you.

It depends on each brand. If you want to know the specific lead time contact us we’ll let you know as soon as we can !

Zerow is part of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation community.

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